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Pages·· MB·23, Downloads·New! Learn the basics of music theory in this comprehensive and easy-to-understand guide. From classical. Books on Music Theory Torrent Download - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. important.

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Contemporary music theory pdf torrent

contemporary music theory pdf torrent

Pages·· MB·23, Downloads·New! Learn the basics of music theory in this comprehensive and easy-to-understand guide. From classical. Music Theory by Eric TaylorFull description The AB Guide to Music Theory - Volume torentinojum.space 86 12 40MB Read more B AB II new. 45 4 KB Read more. The text covers various concepts in music theory, some of which are fundamental, and others are advanced and complex, such as form. COUNTRY HITS 2016 TORRENT Mode for the pass that session will maximize to expensive commercial pricing. Not ask questions you can connect can control the computer and move Flare-On 8 got. For the most I need Citrix. Ultimately that needs application for Windows for PC and ideas about how.

I haven't read even a percentage of it yet, so don't blame me if some of it's crap. I have skimmed quite a few of them, and there are great lessons to be had even for advanced academics; read Schoenberg's Fundamentals only if you are in a daring mood. However the complete basics are covered as well: both dummies' and complete idiots' guides are included.

There are some great listening excersises for both singers and guitarists and even thought I havent been labelling the books by difficulty, it sohuld be the simplest task to read them progreessively judging merely by the titles. I will however recommend Harnum's 'Basic Music Theory' as a starting point for anyone who is already aquainted with an instrument.

Some of these PDF's contain executable code hotlinking and sound embedding. I only ever read PDFs in foxit reader's safe mode, so I cant vouch for the safety of any of it. Also, if there happen to be a dupe in there, please don't shoot the messenger :p Complete list of the contained books: A. Schoenberg - Fundamentals of Musical Composition.

Lersahl, R. Markham Reviewer: DnBeatz - favorite favorite favorite favorite favorite - July 28, Subject: RE: Torrent Good morning, I'm really amazed by the whole effort you must have put into this. I have been trying to download the torrent but for some reason I'm not able to do so. I'm here to ask if there's any chance you may be able to help me. This is a great collection.

Thank you for sharing with us. They are really amazing and very helpful! Live long and prosper. Other topics that took this book well beyond the typical fundamentals text were introductory material about reading musical scores repeat signs, dynamics, tempo markings, etc. Additionally, there are links scattered throughout that go beyond the basic content e. This causes a bit of awkwardness in the chapter on harmonic analysis. For instance, in the analysis exercises in the Cadence section, inverted chords in the solution are labeled with root-position Roman numerals i.

Additionally, if you are looking for part-writing training or post-tonal techniques, you will need to look elsewhere, as these topics are beyond the scope of this text. Most of the content is accurate, as far as I could tell. To be fair, she does fix this label in the chart that follows.

Her explanation of Csus4 vs. C11 is also somewhat lacking, as she does not clarify that the latter has a chordal seventh while the former does not. Aside from these minor quibbles, I had few complaints, and I was impressed with all the physics and acoustics material, which was generally well handled.

The bibliographic information scattered throughout also shows that the author has referenced a wide variety of scholarly musical sources in writing this text. For instance, the author includes numerous activities with a music education bent, such as an activity to teach fractions to elementary-schoolers using musical rhythm, musical meter activities relevant to a wide variety of age groups I used some of these for my college students , and an activity for children on the shape of a melody.

My main complaints regarding relevance and longevity involve some outdated pedagogy and musical examples. Additionally, I was disappointed by the sparse musical examples, which are essential for helping students connect with the material.

Perhaps this was due to copyright concerns, but it was an issue, nonetheless. On the plus side, the fact that this is an open music theory textbook gives it built-in longevity, as many of these complaints could be addressed in the future. Overall, the text is very clear, and I have never received complaints from students about having to read the textbook.

Sometimes there is a bit too much information, though, especially for beginners, as the author provides a lot of tangential material that may be overkill for a first fundamentals course. In the harmonic analysis section, there is no explanation of Roman numerals for seventh chords; the author simply begins using them. Finally, while there are good strategies for finding the key of a piece, there is no demonstration of harmonic analysis, which would have clarified the abstract suggestions.

These points perhaps sound more critical than I intend, for by and large, the book is clearly and lucidly written. When teaching with this book, I found myself having to jump around and assign readings out of order. However, the hyperlinks between different sections of the book are very helpful in preserving consistency between different parts of the text.

Thus, I had to be very explicit about which edition I was referring to when assigning readings. The modularity factor is strong. Overall, a well-organized text, besides the aforementioned differences in organization between editions.

However, topics are sometimes presented in a strange order. For instance, key signatures and the notion of major keys are introduced very early, before a scale has even been defined, as discussed above. While introducing the intuitive notion of key signatures this early was fine i.

Relative minor keys are then introduced, making things even more abstract. A careful instructor can get around these issues by simply skipping the confusing material and coming back to it later, but this does create some extra work for an instructor who wants to use this book. The online interface seemed to be the most user-friendly. The EPUB file worked well on my iPad, but had different chapter numbering from the online version as previously noted.

I loved the links in the online and EPUB editions, which made the text very interactive. However, the audio for some examples included loud hissing or was very quiet, and some examples you have to directly download to hear. There were also broken links scattered throughout the text.

I will say that the built-in exercises were helpful, but I ended up supplementing these with my own homework exercises. The text references a wide variety of styles, including Western classical music, Indian classical music, Medieval music, popular music, and jazz. Hindustani music and Balinese gamelan music are discussed in some depth, which creates a more global perspective than most theory books exhibit.

Additional musical examples, especially from the last few decades, could make the text even more culturally relevant, as most of the material is presented using out-of-context scales, chords, etc. Instructors should just be aware that the most effective use of this book is probably not in order, chapter by chapter, and the instructor will have to plan carefully before the semester begins to determine appropriate topics to include, omit, and reorder.

I couldn't use this book for that course because it doesn't go into enough depth Comprehensiveness rating: 3 see less. I couldn't use this book for that course because it doesn't go into enough depth on subjects such as part writing, counterpoint, resolving chordal dissonances, etc. That being said, I do think this would be a fine resource for a Music Fundamentals course. Also, there is some excellent information in chapter 7 on Ear Training, Tuning Systems, Modes and Ragas, and Transposition which far exceeds what is found in the textbook I currently use.

This information is very valuable and I could see referring my students to it in the future. Overall, I found the book to be accurate. However, I found the some information on intervals, sharps and flats, pentatonic scales, phrases, and the circle of fifths to be less than clear.

Also, some of the musical examples presented for understanding meter were largely jazz-centric and not simple or straightforward enough for beginners or were classified incorrectly. I think this section could be improved by finding more straightforward listening examples that are more varied not so often jazz centric. Generally speaking, the book's content is not obsolete. One update that I think would be helpful would be to go beyond approaching interval identification by counting half steps so that students could learn to identify intervals without merely counting in this way.

The prose is clear and accessible. It does not rely heavily on overly "academic prose" and, for the most part, explains concepts clearly and sequentially. The book is organized well and it is easy to navigate through various topics. I appreciate the searchable index, which I found very helpful. Occasionally, some of the links presented in the book no longer opened as intended.

These could be fixed in an update. It does a nice job of introducing this point of critical thinking to students. I appreciate this book and plan to use some of its contents in the future, particularly the material from Chapter 7: Ear Training, Tuning Systems, Modes and Ragas, and Transposition.

The text is "too complete" for a beginner level study of music theory. Much of the text can be deleted with no ill effect, for example Chapter 3 pp. There are numerous errors and omissions, and other reviewers have correctly noticed a bias versus guitar players, where the author uses condescending tone on several occasions.

Errors include listing the types of musical texture out of order: in order of complexity it should read 1. In addition, the definition of non-western music fails to recognize non-European styles in the western hemisphere. All throughout the text, more current musical examples than art music of the 18th and 19th centuries should be cited to inspire and captivate the young reader. One other example, the content would be more relevant and interesting to beginner-level college students if the author emphasized references to topics such as "The Nashville System" and its impact on studio and recording musicians when discussing Roman Numerals.

The writing style is verbose - which frankly is not at all appealing to college-age students whose available time due to work study and other commitments is at a premium. The book should be edited and condensed by deleting and re-wording the superfluous language.

The text is consistently inconsistent. What is lacking is a glossary to tie the book together. The author made attempts at this pp. The author has divided the chapters into sections, but the overall effect is too many words. Again lengthy explanations are unnecessary. Get to the point. Repeat the point. Move on. The text should be re-organized into focused chapters of shorter length, each of which cover the single subject more concisely.

A minimalist approach to writing style and a logical succession of chapter titles would help, instead of so many cross-references which usually take the reader hopping throughout the book. Sidebars with definitions can cut down this busywork. Navigation problems include the references every chapter to citations in other chapters, which has the student leap frogging unnecessarily.

Smart use of sidebars can minimize this interruption. The author does not need to "tie everything together". The author's use of colloquial writing is an annoyance. The author is attempting a friendly discourse but it contradicts the lengthy verbose writing style everywhere else.

While not technically grammatically in error, the end result is incongruent, wasting valuable time for any student who may be working two jobs to help pay for their college textbooks. When using foreign words and providing a pronunciation, make sure it is correct. For example: mezzo is not pronounced with a "t", but rather "MED-zo", using the thick Italian T which sounds to the American ear more like a D. This may well offend any serious student of Latin or Italian.

Page 7 the author mentions Bass and Treble clef, but nowhere mentions F-clef or G-clef. Pages are a good start; author needs to elaborate. Page 29 author states: "may connect the notes that are all in the same beat" instead of teaching the student the correct approach is to "beam the beats". Page 42 missed the chance to discuss "anacrusis". Page 51 missed the definition of "rubato" as "steal time".

Page 59 missed clear definitions of Legato notes long and connected , Staccato notes short and separated , and in between Portato notes long but separated. Page 79 the quotation from the "Chorale" symphony contains an error at the end of line 3; the "E" is syncopated and tied to the next measure in the double bass solo. Page the Circle of 5ths Ascends to the Right and Descends to the Left it is an error to call the flat keys the "circle of 4ths". Page missed the chance to teach the Greek word "chromos" - meaning "all colors" - as the basis for "Chromatic Scale".

Page did not discuss "anhematonic pentatonic scale" - by definition, a five-note scale that has NO half-steps. Fun reading. Best wishes. This book is intended to cover the "bare essentials" of music theory, such as those covered in a fundamentals or prerequisite course at a high school or college level.

The index includes the necessary topics at that level. However, the text However, the text emphasizes definitions and explanations, rather than exercises and examples, which makes it an insufficient text for the beginner learner. The content is carefully written. However, in an attempt to be conversational and accessible, the author writes in oversimplifications that border on the inaccurate or misleading.

Examples of this can be found in chapter 3. I would not recommend anyone utilize this chapter. The book's strength is its conversational, accessible writing style. It is also clearly organized, and terms are highlighted and defined.

In the online version of the text, hyperlinked terms make finding definitions easy. Because of the clear division and subdivision of topics in the book's index, it is easy to identify modules relevant to a particular topic. The book is organized clearly into topics and subtopics.

The exception is Chapter 3 Definitions , which only has one subheading each for such substantial topics as harmony and counterpoint. Even given that this is a basic text, more space could have been devoted to these topics, at the expense of others e.

In attempting to be basic and brief, the book does a disservice to the topic of music in non-Western cultures. For instance, the author states in Chapter 3. Another statement that generalizes to the point of misrepresentation is this statement: "If you live in a Western culture, it can be difficult to find recordings of non-Western folk music, since most Western listeners do not have a taste for it.

The author should be commended in attempting to create a very readable, organized, and accessible text to introduce new musicians to the most important topics. However, while some content may be useful as background reading at the most basic level, the book does not lend itself to use within a course. The language used is too general to be used in an academic setting, and the lack of exercises, exhibits, and musical examples leave the reader with little path to true comprehension or mastery of music theory skills.

Perhaps the largest reason this book is unsuitable for use in a course is that its focus is misaligned to most music theory sequences. The book spends significant space on topics in the scientific basis of music, such as tuning systems, the physical basis of sound, and mathematical derivations.

While these topics may be germane to the author's personal interests and training, they are not very important in the early stages of study for applied musicians such as those the author lists on the very first page of her book: "[a] trumpet player interested in jazz, a vocalist interested in early music, a pianist interested in classical composition, and a guitarist interested in world music. Overall, this text may be most useful simply as a glossary for definitions of musical terms.

This book does include an index of terms, which can be quite helpful. It doesn't quite cover as much as is normally covered in a single text for music theory instruction in many college courses. Some topics are discussed well enough, while others Some topics are discussed well enough, while others leave or gloss over standard sections.

In other cases, the author chooses topics either adjacent to or nearly unrelated to standard music theory texts. Indeed, I thought everyone was overstating the issue a bit until I checked it for myself. Far too long, with portions that could have been incorporated into other chapters in the book with ease. Considering the topic, most of the elements in a music theory text will remain relevant for a long period of time. Some texts include examples of music that are very current, but do not become irrelevant for those current examples.

This book does a fine job of showing information that seems well researched with recent studies and long-established theory techniques. I found the majority of the text very easy to understand, with exceptions during the physics chapter where a few of the sections were a bit unclear. Considering the content of this text and that it is intended as an introductory source for beginning students, I believe complete clarity should be the goal.

While sections of this text could be subdivided for use in coursework, substantial page lengths on the very first chapter, along with the nearly as lengthy second chapter, cause this to rate lower. Those first two chapters are so long I know my students would despair any reading assignment solely on the basis of length.

As stated earlier, the definitions and terms presented in Chapter 2 could easily have been and should perhaps have been pieced out to different chapters covering those topics. I do not see a purpose why they should all be grouped together. Additionally, the break between learning about notation to then wait for two more chapters to learn about Notes and Scales seems illogical in the extreme. No noticeable defects in the interface.

Navigation would benefit from links to jump to chapters, but otherwise no issues. The text is not culturally insensitive in any way, but does lack inclusion of non-Western music techniques. Considering some of the side topics presented in the text, inclusion of non-Western music would not be unfeasible to include.

Comprehensiveness rating: 2 see less. For a music major, it would not be able to be used beyond the first semester of the music theory sequence and much of the first 90 pages would likely be skipped by music majors who already know how to read music, and typically schools adopt a textbook set that covers semesters of music theory in the music major theory sequence.

A music major fundamentals course prior to Theory I would not need quite that much on notation, but too detailed for a non-music major music appreciation course. This book goes on to spend a significant amount of time on tuning, harmonic series and acoustics, which would most likely be overwhelming to a non-music major. These topics are not always even included in standard music theory textbooks for music majors, or if they are, it does not have much time spent on it.

This book takes pages in until it even gets to talking about intervals! The book, however, does include a lot of definitions throughout the text, but at times can be overwhelming with just pages and pages of definitions without examples—just text, like a research paper. The text includes a decently well detailed index at the end but no glossary.

It has links to an online website with more information, which is a good idea. My guess is there is more if you read it word for word. That would be much less confusing to someone reading this for the first time pg. If it was a textbook on 21st century or more modern music, that may be more of an issue. The textbook is generally pretty clear in its explanations, although a bit wordy at times. It has long paragraphs of text sometimes without having any examples or anything to break up the textual information.

It seemed very definitions-based. While there are other issues with this textbook, it is very consistent in its formatting. Terms are bolded, examples contain red and blue color highlighter, and sections are organized with headings. The text is divided into a copious amount of sections within a chapter. That said, I think it would benefit from a greater number of chapters and lower number of divisions within each chapter.

They are divided into very small sections, but the large number of divisions within a long chapter creates confusion when you have headings like 1. Besides comprehensiveness or usefulness in a music major theory vs. It will likely confuse them.

The book is more than half way through before it mentions key signatures and circle of 5ths. Form only gets about 6 pages. Scales are all mushed together, including pentatonic, 12 tone, whole tone, etc. Modulation only gets 2 paragraphs. Roman numerals are not thoroughly explained to do harmonic analysis if you did not already know this.

Counterpoint only gets a short paragraph. Cadences are only very basically explained. Ear Training is at the end and is not a thorough enough explanation to begin to learn that. However, I would appreciate greater variety of examples to keep the reader from getting bored. It does not have much other than examples with the picture of a keyboard or staff lines.

Other pictures, graphics, charts, colors, text backgrounds, etc. I found it to be relatively free of errors. This text seemed pretty good in that regard, other than some minor issues regarding word order or lacking spaces between some words, but you can understand it without significant problems.

I found no issues with this. My review and opinions are based on what I know of standard music theory textbooks, which come from my own undergraduate theory courses, graduate level work in the pedagogy of music theory, and my own teaching as a DMA student.

At this point, I still see a value in purchasing a traditional textbook, if I am comparing this with many of the well-known, standard theory textbooks that I have looked at before. For a book on basic music theory, this textbook is quite if not excessively comprehensive, covering much of what should or could be covered in a Theory Fundamentals or Remedial Theory course.

The text approaches music theory from a physical sound waves, overtones, and other physical science and world perspective attempting to integrate aspects of jazz and non-western music with typical western music theory. The content appears to be mostly error-free with a few exceptions that I found: - Minor grammatical issues: nothing too serious. My favorite example, though was on pp. For consistency, the author could use what they wrote in Figure 1.

Perhaps the author could say: "How many beats in a measure". Some small mention of hypermeter might do well here. By involving non-Western music, jazz, and popular music alongside Western classical music, the text provides a resource that is relevant in modern society at large. Updates undoubtedly will need to occur as time goes on, but any relevant music theory book will have to do so. Although the text often provides succinct definitions for musical terms, it does tend to be somewhat on the verbose side.

With music being a somewhat difficult subject to capture verbally, I would have appreciated more visual and audio examples. The text's framework and terminology is mostly consistent see "accuracy" section for an example where the book is somewhat inconsistent. The text, although at times quite wordy, are divided into units that could easily be addressed perhaps at times with some pre-assigned reading within a typical class period.

The flow of this text is where I take the most issue. Beginning with the chapter on notation requires the reader to look ahead from nearly every section in the chapter to fully understand each concept. I understand with the larger organization of the text why these topics are not put close together, however, I would advise shifting chapters or sections around to avoid constantly flipping ahead in the book.

It might be nice to move the chapter on definitions or the chapter on physical science to the beginning. In any case, the sections on tone and rhythm should occur before the sections on notation. Several of the hyperlinks are ineffective. On the positive side, the images are all free of distortion. There are a few grammatical errors see "Accuracy".

They are mostly minor issues that would not greatly distract from the subject at hand. This is a huge bonus for this text. It makes a point to cover aspects of music involving jazz and popular music topics such as chord symbols, upper extensions, and swing, as well as world music topics such as exotic scales and ragas.

Although based in Western theory, the text involves plenty of non-Western musical approaches. This text would be ideal for a theory fundamentals or remedial theory course - especially if there is minimal teacher interaction available. Although at times the text diverges to topics arguably more advanced than basic ie altered chords , with guided reading the student could fill gaps in their musical knowledge that would better prepare them for a collegiate music education.

One additional suggestion would be to have even more exercises available at the end of each section. The text is fairly comprehensive, a bit too comprehensive for a music fundamentals class. Sections of the book go a little too much in depth for a beginning music theory student with no experience. The index is useful and thorough. The materials presented are accurate and presented well, though the sequence of materials is perhaps different than other similar texts.

Explanations are sometimes too in depth and others too shallow. The text is current and is not likely to lose its relevance. The elements of music are fairly constant, though teaching styles may vary. Updates should be simple to make.

The writing is accessible and reads well. At times, the explanations are too lengthy for a beginning fundamentals text and cover elements that are for more advanced study. Consistency is appropriate for the subject. Terms and explanations are constant throughout the text. The text is easily divisible into smaller sections. Instructors should be able to tailor the content to fit their desired teaching style and delivery method.

The flow can be a bit awkward at times, mentioning terms and concepts before an explanation has been provided. The text seems to wander as it covers a bit too much material for a fundamentals course. The text discusses western music and is not meant to be all-inclusive culturally.

I discern nothing offensive in the text. This textbook is very comprehensive in the range of subjects it covers. In an effort to "cover all the bases", some of the most crucial skills necessary for understanding music theory receive relatively superficial treatment, while topics with In an effort to "cover all the bases", some of the most crucial skills necessary for understanding music theory receive relatively superficial treatment, while topics with less immediate application are covered in great detail.

For example, one might question whether a student with no musical background could successfully learn to read music notation given the brief explanations and limited exercises presented in the opening chapter, and one might also be skeptical of the usefulness of such a detailed explanation of the physics of sound to the beginning musician. That said, the topics covered in the textbook represents a broad base of knowledge. The book is generally quite accurate with occasional lapses.

It would be best if all musical examples could be explained accurately with the information presented in the textbook. It is not likely that the subject matter will become out-dated, so this textbook should remain relevant for a long period of time. Supplementing the text with new information should be easy to incorporate.

The book is clear and well-written. Again, for the non-musician, the compressed presentation of some topics, e. One of the strengths of this book might be its modularity. Chapters are relatively self-contained and could be used to supplement other textbooks or course materials. The organization of this textbook is somewhat baffling and, perhaps, its weakest attribute. For instance, it is perplexing that the concept of key signatures is introduced in the first 20 pages, yet intervals and the circle of fifths are not discussed until the second half of the book.

The textbook has rather primitive-looking graphics and notational examples. But it doesn't detract from the overall effectiveness of the textbook. The book is grounded in Western European tradition, but makes some effort to be culturally inclusive. Its language is in no way culturally insensitive. This textbook is very intriguing and well-written. However, I would find it difficult to use as a primary textbook for either music majors or non-majors.

It lacks the necessary depth in subjects like figured bass and harmonic analysis for music majors, and it covers too much ground for a music appreciation or music fundamentals classes. However, it might be an excellent supplemental textbook for all three of the prior courses and a host of other music classes.

In some ways, this book is very comprehensive — maybe too comprehensive do we really need words on tuning systems in an introductory text? But it does cover all of the topics you could expect to get through in an introductory theory But it does cover all of the topics you could expect to get through in an introductory theory class. So much of introductory music theory is about mastering skills like reading music and building scales and chords.

There are some exercises in this book, but there is no attempt at bridging the gap between the concepts being discussed and their practical application. The core content of the book such as notation, scales, and chords is well-traveled ground. We live in an era where someone in a video will take you by the hand and show you how to voice an C7b9 chord, the best way to finger a Bach cello suite, or how to create the nastiest bass drop in your dubstep remix.

Perhaps the answer is a text that is open source, allowing many users to edit and contribute to the text? The best music theory writing emerges organically from a question or observation about a piece of music. Music must be at the center of any effective music theory discussion. This book takes the opposite approach, introducing many topics abstractly without any reference to an actual piece of music.

Take for example its discussion of the triad: 5. Triads are simple three note chords Chords built of thirds pg In root position, the root, which is the note that names the chord, is the lowest note. The third of the chord is written a third Figure 4. So the simplest way to write a triad is as a stack of thirds, in root position. When you understand the triad, a whole world of harmony opens up to you. Some of our students are artists. Some of our students are civilians who are starting a potentially life- long engagement with the arts.

If teaching music theory is important, we must get in the habit of writing our textbooks with clarity and passion. When the book references material from other sections, it clearly points students in the direction of that material. The organization of the topics made sense. The chapter on acoustics, while informative, seemed to disrupt the flow of the rest of the book a bit although one could skip that chapter without any problem. All of this works to make entry-level music theory look as inviting as the instructions on your tax return.

And many of the links are broken. The diagrams are unappealing and poorly laid out, making it difficult to understand the concepts they are trying to communicate for example, the circle of fifths chart in Fig. The book is set mostly in black and white, but every once in a while parts of the text in figures will be arbitrarily printed in red or blue see Figure 1. The most troubling element is that the musical examples themselves look amateurish. Music notation software capable of creating professional-looking music layouts has been widely accessible for decades.

Some of the problems I have are quibbles like the out-of —proportion bass clef in Fig. But in an introductory theory class where learning to clearly and correctly notate music is a priority, sloppy musical examples are inexcusable. There is very little actual music in this text, and as a result the book has almost entirely removed music theory from its cultural context.

It equally ignores the actual music of most eras and cultures. It does deal with some theory topics outside of the realm of classical music, such as the blues scale. I realize the nature of this project might limit it to public domain music, but that still includes a vast amount of repertoire.

Also, there is some room under fair use for some use of copyrighted material and maybe the Open Library Textbook project could guide authors on how to use that right to its fullest extent. Her task was not only to write a theory text from scratch, but also to make the case that an open textbook could be a viable alternative to commercially produced textbooks. This is a necessary and important first step.

Overall, the text is a comprehensive approach to the fundamentals of music theory, with particular focus on the standards and conventions of music notation. There is a detailed index but no glossary. The addition of a glossary could be helpful, The addition of a glossary could be helpful, especially with regard to terminology that is often mixed-up or easily confused by students beginning to read music - "meter" vs. This is described in a note in the body of the text, but appearing in a glossary would make for a quicker, more straightforward delineation between the two concepts.

The content, in general, is accurate and unbiased. Some of the notational symbols are a bit of out the ordinary - the double-flat, for instance - is graphically not quite what one would see in printed music the flat signs "smushed" together or overlapping. This may be a result of the unique notation program being used to render the musical examples.

Content is relevant and will not be obsolete, other than perhaps occasional references to specific technologies. The tone of the text is straightforward and accessible. Concepts are expressed simply and directly. This is perhaps this text's greatest strength - the sectionalization and numbering of each concept. There is occasional self-reference, but entirely to the benefit of the reader in developing upon concepts and ideas. The text is very easily navigable and assigning discrete units to correspond with distinct sections of an assignment or course outline would be very easy for any instructor to manage.

Overall, the organization of the topics in this text is good. Perhaps the early, detailed introduction to acoustics Ch. The interface of the text seems clear and easy to navigate. It took me a while to realized the linked content in footnotes was occasionally supplemental material and not just online access to the print material of the text - this could be made more explicit in the front matter of the book. The grammar is accurate. Occasionally the tone of the text suggests a certain uncertainty using colloquial terms like "pretty much", "tends to", etc.

Although there are not many examples of notated musical works cited in the text for reasons of copyright, presumably , there are mentions of musical examples from a diverse variety of cultural backgrounds. The title and introduction's stated objective "to explore basic music theory so thoroughly that the interested student will then be able to easily pick up whatever further theory is wanted" are vague enough that the question of comprehensiveness The title and introduction's stated objective "to explore basic music theory so thoroughly that the interested student will then be able to easily pick up whatever further theory is wanted" are vague enough that the question of comprehensiveness becomes difficult.

There is in the book a comprehensive discussion of musical mechanics and notation, in some cases more than a "basic" course would require specifically discussions of orchestration, acoustics, and temperament. However, these tangential topics are far from comprehensive themselves. Also, it is difficult to place this in a college music theory curriculum; it's too advanced at times to fit the rudiments or fundamental i. As an introductory survey of music-theoretical concepts, however, I would call this very comprehensive.

The book is accurate for the most part, if imprecise at times. Da capo and Dal segno are also translated incorrectly as "to" the head and sign, although the gist remains correct i. The basic mechanics of music and music notation are unlikely to change soon, but some broken links here--apparently intended to take the reader to online discussions about certain ideas--suggest that it might already be out of date.

There is some indication on another website that updates are being made, or were intended to be made, by the author, but it isn't clear what the timeline for these updates is. The only date seems to be the original publication date of The conversational style of the prose undermines the book's clarity. The technical terminology is adequately explained, although sometimes it is not well-defined at the time it is introduced. However, a hyperlink is always provided to a more complete definition.

Generally, the book is modular enough to be useful. I can envision a teacher being able to easily realign the subunits without presenting disruption to the reader. However, the layout of the epub version, especially often detaches subheadings from text, causing some mild confusion. It seems like modularity has won out over logical flow of ideas. Enharmonic intervals and chords are included in the discussion of enharmonic pitches, for example, well before the concept of chords is introduced.

I like the idea of links, but they might be overdone. The structure of the text relies on students' ability to make good use of the links to follow threads of complementary and reinforcing ideas, but beginning students won't know what fits together, and they could get lost. Also, there are intrusive notes from the author regarding an online survey, which is now closed, throughout the text. The layout epub version feels cluttered.

I would appreciate more space between headings and text, as well as above and below musical examples. Musical examples were very amateurish, using an unusual music font that was difficult to read. The text contains no grammatical errors, though inconsistencies in style and fonts are distracting and imprecise. The text does a good job including discussion of or at least mentioning music from a variety of cultures.

At the risk of criticizing the book for what it isn't instead of what it is, I would just say that for this reviewer, an introductory text that had less prose and more focused text, such as lists with key terms, definitions, etc. The book covers material corresponding to what most call Basic Musicianship and Fundamentals of Music and Music Notation, as well as more general terminology that would apply to Music Appreciation.

It also adds material introducing the basic It also adds material introducing the basic concepts of the Physics of Music and how it works in various instruments. Despite showing modules on Form, Cadence, and Beginning Harmonic Analysis, the author makes it clear that many of these concepts are more advanced and recommends additional sources be used. The book could use a module covering figured bass -- and although there is a cross reference to other published software on this topic ArsNova , that software requires purchase or a site license and is not accessible through the open source text.

The text is written in a way that updates should be easy to implement, and the author is very conscientious to tell students in the preface that whenever multiple terms exist, they will be given. The text is clearly written. I particularly like that the author sometimes interrupts the "facts" by asking questions which take the reader to the next explanation. This begins to subconsciously set a theoretical mindset of looking for deeper explanations.

I especially recommend that everyone read the Introduction before going into any of the modules! It is one of the best parts of the book, and not only sets the stage for what the book does, but also how it fits within the larger context of explanations.

The book is clear, with terminology consistent throughout. But, different modules seem to be written for different levels of students. The early chapters are presented very basically and are extremely thorough -- some even contain external lesson plans clearly written for beginning classroom teachers following national standards. Later chapters, such as those on acoustics and terminology, seem to be addressed to a college audience.

This extends to methodology as well. Earlier content is more algorithmic in nature teaching treble clef as EveryGoodBoyDoesFine instead of G-clef with the alphabet surrounding the G-line ; later material is more linguistic definitions of different textures and presentation of interval inversion, for example. It is not offensive, but it does make for some awkwardness if one jumps around in the modular sequence.

Modularity is one of the best aspects of this publication. Sections are clear; subheadings are frequent, examples are peppered throughout, and everything is graphically pleasing. It would be easy to use some modules and not others and maintain consistency. The book generally follows an established pedagogical flow frequent in many similar presentations. The only interruption is with the Physics materials.

It does make sense to introduce the scientific explanations when they are pertinent, but it would also be helpful to collect them all in one place. For thorough review readers, compile Module 3 with 4. I found the book difficult to navigate on a Mac and iOS. I did not test materials on a Windows interface.

CNX is by far the easiest to navigate with the cleanest links. All versions require that one leave the text and download the audio examples, play the examples, and then return to the text. Many examples would not play. When I would look up the direct weblink in footnotes, I would often encounter "error ". It would be difficult for a less patient person to keep trying in different formats. I was initially confused by the fact that Examples, Exercises, and Text all have numbers but that the numbers don't necessarily align.

Text unit 4. For a while, I couldn't find anything and their placement made no sense while jumping from module to module and checking out answers. Once I figured it out, it was okay but remains counterintuitive. The book primarily is focused on materials relevant to popular, jazz, and classical musicians. Lead sheet and Roman numerals are both covered, but there is a clear tilt towards the skills and knowledge needed for gigging musicians.

There is some inclusion of other cultures and nontraditional scales, moreso than in most introductory books of this nature. Modes and Ragas are covered, as well as octatonic and some older scales such as Hungarian major. With the exception of using "Every Good Boy Does Fine", the prose is ungendered and the explanation that underlies "western" and "world" terminology is clearly presented and its bias is acknowledged. This book is most appropriate for use by amateurs who wish to know some details about the construction of musical elements.

It would be useful as a textbook in a non-AP secondary school level music theory class. It could also be a good supplement for students taking a Music Appreciation type of Gen-Ed course. It could possibly supplement a World Music Gen-Ed course. It is not appropriate for adoption by music majors at the university level for anything past a first-semester or remedial Music Fundamentals course. It could, however, be a good resource for summer study by music students prior to their first university theory course.

The author has clearly spent a great deal of time and effort on this resource, and I hope she continues her devotion to the task. Disclaimer: I am a coauthor of a different Music Fundamentals textbook; nonetheless, I have reviewed this resource objectively and dispassionately and made every attempt at balanced scholarly evaluation in my comments.

This is a valuable resource for everyone concerned about the cost of materials to consider. The text covers the basics of music theory as laid out in the table of contents in four of six sections with some additional peripheral material in the other two sections. While some subjects are well covered, including the most important basics This makes an instructor an essential element in terms of how to present the material, how much of it to present, in what order to present it, and what perhaps is better left to another course.

The introduction explains the rationale to the book and suggests the many ways it could be used. The table of contents is very well organized presenting topics and sub-headings that function as keywords. The index was less useful as it was a bit confusing, in some cases referring generally to sections but not necessarily specific to the item being looked up. Terms were generally given a specific page, but some were missing. A glossary would have been helpful. Content is up-to-date, but not in a way that will quickly make the text obsolete within a short period of time.

Sometimes the text is clear, straight forward and easily accessible, unfolding complex ideas in a clear step-by-step manner that aids in overall comprehension. At other times, however, the text is wordy and confusing, introducing terms that are not always explained, and often requiring the reader to jump about to receive those explanations. Some of the more basic yet difficult to grasp ideas, as for example the basics of rhythm such as downbeat and upbeat, are more easily shown by example, perhaps a video link, in the event the book is being used in a class where musical demonstration might not be available by the instructor.

The text is not consistent in terms of terminology and framework, some chapters are very advanced but incomplete, while others are clear and lucid. The first module on notation seemed the most complete, being comprehensive, clear and well laid out in terms of organization and unfolding of the topic. This is the strongest suit of the book, being well sectioned and in such a way that modules can be arranged and re-arranged with sub-headings also referenced numerically, i.

The topics in the text are often, but not always, presented in a logical and clear fashion. It is sometimes necessary to jump about to get a more comprehensive understanding of a topic. Some very advanced concepts are introduced in an incomplete manner and then dropped, perhaps better to be left for another course. Other ideas seem to interrupt rather than complement what is being presented.

To be fair, the author states up front that people have different needs and are at different levels, and what might suit one might not do as well for another. That is the beauty of the modular organization, that it can be refitted in so many ways, but it will require that insight from an instructor, so this is not a book to be recommended for those who wish to be self-taught. There are many music examples given in the text which display what is going on, and there are often links to sound or score samples of music that demonstrate the various concepts under discussion.

Not all of the links worked, but that is something that can be addressed as the work undergoes review and revision. While the theory of music is culturally neutral, the examples that underscore draw from an inclusive of a variety of races, ethnicities, and backgrounds, and styles, and from popular, rock and jazz as well as classical musics. This is such an enormous venture to undertake that I can only express deepest admiration and congratulations for the fine work that has been presented thus far, acknowledging that this book has the potential to reach a very wide audience of potential converts to the wonderment of the musical arts through an understanding of the structures and ideas that form the basis of musical creation, musical performance, musical listening, and musical enjoyment.

Kudos and much thanks. The text is imbalanced in proportion. I don't believe it necessary to have 63 pages on notation Section 1 , the longest section in the book. Perhaps there is also a distinction to be made in scope under the umbrella "music theory," between Perhaps there is also a distinction to be made in scope under the umbrella "music theory," between mechanics notation and key signatures , and analysis.

In any case, the time spent on notation is disproportionate given the length of the other sections of the book. There is no glossary; terms are only referenced in the index. There certainly should be a consolidated, systematic glossary, especially given how much jumping around is already built into the book e.

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Ravel Orchestral Music Dean W. Handel's Operas Durr A. The Cantatas of J. Bach Eustace J. Breakspeare — Mozart Fay L. Shostakovich and his world Feller Ross. A history of opera. Milestones and metamorphoses Floros C. Beyond Avant-garde and Postmodernism Frederick J. Crowest — Beethoven Fuller-Maitland J. Music history during the renaissance period, Gibbs C. H, Gooley D. Franz Liszt and his world Gibbs C. H, Solvik M. Franz Schubert and his world Goldschmidt H.

Franz Schubert Gould Glenn. So you want to write a fugue Graf Max. From Beethoven to Shostakovich Grey T. Richard Wagner and his world Grier J. Jean Sibelius and his world Grove G. Beethoven and his nine symphonies Guldbrandsen E, Johnson J. Transformations of musical modernism Haar. European Music, Hahn A.

Alban Berg and his world Haines J. Eight Centuries of Troubadouries Haldey O. Mamontov's Private Opera Harley J. His life and music Heavy Metal. The music and its culture Heribert R. A Biographical Romance Higley S. New music at Darmstadt. The style of Palestrina and the dissonance Joseph C. Stravinsky inside out Kamienski L.

Mozart as revealed in his own words Kinderman — Beethoven Kramer L. Richrad Wagner. Music and protest in Lang Z. The legacy of Johann Strauss. Duke Ellington and his world Led Zeppelin. Guillaume de Machaut Levin F. Stravinsky and his world Lockwood L. Music in Renaissance Ferrara - Loewenberg A. Annals Of Opera - Mathews W. Popular history of the art of music Mawer D. French music and jazz in conversation. Self-fashioning in the italian madrigal Mertens W.

The Russian Opera Nohl L. Life of Mozart vol. Experimental Music. Cage and Beyond Oliver M. Igor Stravinsky Otto J. Life of Mozart 1 Otto J. Life of Mozart 2 Otto J. Life of Mozart 3 Owen B. The organ music of J. Brahms Perlis V. The New Music. The Avant-garde since Reich S.

Writings on music, Rosen C. Hard-Bop Ross. The Symphonies Of Mozart Shedlock. Beethoven Sitsky L. Music of the repressed russian avant garde Spitta P. Bach, vol. The Keyboard Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti and the 18th. History of Western Music 5 vol Taruskin R. On Russian Music Tchaikovsky M. Tchaikovsky Terry S. Bach's Chorales 1 Terry S. Bach's Chorales 2 Terry S. Rock music in the Mirror of Romanticism Tomlinsos G. Monteverdi and the End of the Renaissance Traubner R.

A theatrical history Upton E. Music and performance in the later middle ages Wiebe H. Britten's unquiet pasts. Sound and memory in postwar reconstruction Williams P. Bach Williams Peter. Musical witness and Holocaust representation Wolf J.

Handbuch der Notationskunde. Tonschriften der Neuzeit Wolff. II Zeigler R. Smithsonian music. Musica Latina. Orgelbau Herbie Hancock. Jazz Parnass 1 Schmitz M. User icon An illustration of a person's head and chest. Sign up Log in. Web icon An illustration of a computer application window Wayback Machine Texts icon An illustration of an open book.

Books Video icon An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video Audio icon An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio Software icon An illustration of a 3. Software Images icon An illustration of two photographs. Images Donate icon An illustration of a heart shape Donate Ellipses icon An illustration of text ellipses.

EMBED for wordpress. Want more? Advanced embedding details, examples, and help! I swept the usenets uncriticvally for every ebook I could find relating to the subject, weeded out the dupes and fakes, and wrapped it up. I haven't read even a percentage of it yet, so don't blame me if some of it's crap. I have skimmed quite a few of them, and there are great lessons to be had even for advanced academics; read Schoenberg's Fundamentals only if you are in a daring mood.

However the complete basics are covered as well: both dummies' and complete idiots' guides are included. There are some great listening excersises for both singers and guitarists and even thought I havent been labelling the books by difficulty, it sohuld be the simplest task to read them progreessively judging merely by the titles. I will however recommend Harnum's 'Basic Music Theory' as a starting point for anyone who is already aquainted with an instrument. Some of these PDF's contain executable code hotlinking and sound embedding.

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So you want to write a fugue Graf Max. From Beethoven to Shostakovich Grey T. Richard Wagner and his world Grier J. Jean Sibelius and his world Grove G. Beethoven and his nine symphonies Guldbrandsen E, Johnson J. Transformations of musical modernism Haar. European Music, Hahn A. Alban Berg and his world Haines J. Eight Centuries of Troubadouries Haldey O. Mamontov's Private Opera Harley J. His life and music Heavy Metal. The music and its culture Heribert R. A Biographical Romance Higley S.

New music at Darmstadt. The style of Palestrina and the dissonance Joseph C. Stravinsky inside out Kamienski L. Mozart as revealed in his own words Kinderman — Beethoven Kramer L. Richrad Wagner. Music and protest in Lang Z. The legacy of Johann Strauss. Duke Ellington and his world Led Zeppelin. Guillaume de Machaut Levin F. Stravinsky and his world Lockwood L. Music in Renaissance Ferrara - Loewenberg A. Annals Of Opera - Mathews W.

Popular history of the art of music Mawer D. French music and jazz in conversation. Self-fashioning in the italian madrigal Mertens W. The Russian Opera Nohl L. Life of Mozart vol. Experimental Music. Cage and Beyond Oliver M. Igor Stravinsky Otto J. Life of Mozart 1 Otto J. Life of Mozart 2 Otto J. Life of Mozart 3 Owen B. The organ music of J. Brahms Perlis V. The New Music. The Avant-garde since Reich S.

Writings on music, Rosen C. Hard-Bop Ross. The Symphonies Of Mozart Shedlock. Beethoven Sitsky L. Music of the repressed russian avant garde Spitta P. Bach, vol. The Keyboard Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti and the 18th. History of Western Music 5 vol Taruskin R. On Russian Music Tchaikovsky M. Tchaikovsky Terry S. Bach's Chorales 1 Terry S. Bach's Chorales 2 Terry S. Rock music in the Mirror of Romanticism Tomlinsos G. Monteverdi and the End of the Renaissance Traubner R.

A theatrical history Upton E. Music and performance in the later middle ages Wiebe H. Britten's unquiet pasts. Sound and memory in postwar reconstruction Williams P. Bach Williams Peter. Musical witness and Holocaust representation Wolf J. Handbuch der Notationskunde. Tonschriften der Neuzeit Wolff. II Zeigler R. Smithsonian music. Musica Latina.

Orgelbau Herbie Hancock. Jazz Parnass 1 Schmitz M. Music, cosmology and the politics of harmony in Early China Cook S. Rhythms of the Afroatlantic music Nordlind T. Svensk folkmusik och folkdans Samson J. Music in the Balkans Soroker Y. Ukrainian musical elements in classical music Zeranska-Kominek S.

Muzyka w kulturze. The study of orchestration 2 Forsyth Cecil. Orchestration Leibowitz R, Maguire J. Il pensiero orchestrale Miller G. Method for orchestral arranging Piston. Beethoven the pianist Vlahopol Gabriela. Schubert's fingerprints. Roots - the relationship between the global and the local within the Extreme Metal scene Sambamoorthy P.

History of indian music Valeri Tsatsishvili. Automatic subgenre classification of heavy metal music Wicke P. Rock music. The nature of music from a biological perspective Scott D. Sounds of the metropolis Tymoczko D. Adorno on Popular Culture After Adorno. Rethinking Music Sociology Dunbar J. Women, music, culture.

An introduction Peretz I. The nature of music from a biological perspective Pesic P. Music and the making of modern science Peters G. Philosophy of music. An introduction Stone K. Twentieth century organ music Austin L, Kahn D. H, Gooley D. Franz Liszt and his world Gibbs C. H, Solvik M. Franz Schubert and his world Goldschmidt H. Franz Schubert Gould Glenn. So you want to write a fugue Graf Max. From Beethoven to Shostakovich Grey T. Richard Wagner and his world Grier J. Jean Sibelius and his world Grove G.

Beethoven and his nine symphonies Guldbrandsen E, Johnson J. Transformations of musical modernism Haar. European Music, Hahn A. Alban Berg and his world Haines J. Eight Centuries of Troubadouries Haldey O. Mamontov's Private Opera Harley J.

His life and music Heavy Metal. The music and its culture Heribert R. A Biographical Romance Higley S. New music at Darmstadt. The style of Palestrina and the dissonance Joseph C. Stravinsky inside out Kamienski L. Mozart as revealed in his own words Kinderman — Beethoven Kramer L.

Richrad Wagner. Music and protest in Lang Z. The legacy of Johann Strauss. Duke Ellington and his world Led Zeppelin. Guillaume de Machaut Levin F. Stravinsky and his world Lockwood L. Music in Renaissance Ferrara - Loewenberg A. Annals Of Opera - Mathews W.

Popular history of the art of music Mawer D. French music and jazz in conversation. Self-fashioning in the italian madrigal Mertens W. The Russian Opera Nohl L. Life of Mozart vol. Experimental Music. Cage and Beyond Oliver M. Igor Stravinsky Otto J. Life of Mozart 1 Otto J. Life of Mozart 2 Otto J. Life of Mozart 3 Owen B.

The organ music of J. Brahms Perlis V. The New Music. The Avant-garde since Reich S. Writings on music, Rosen C. Hard-Bop Ross. The Symphonies Of Mozart Shedlock. Beethoven Sitsky L. Music of the repressed russian avant garde Spitta P. Bach, vol. The Keyboard Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti and the 18th. History of Western Music 5 vol Taruskin R.

On Russian Music Tchaikovsky M. Tchaikovsky Terry S. Bach's Chorales 1 Terry S. Bach's Chorales 2 Terry S. Rock music in the Mirror of Romanticism Tomlinsos G. Monteverdi and the End of the Renaissance Traubner R. A theatrical history Upton E. Music and performance in the later middle ages Wiebe H. Britten's unquiet pasts. Sound and memory in postwar reconstruction Williams P. Bach Williams Peter. Musical witness and Holocaust representation Wolf J. Handbuch der Notationskunde. Tonschriften der Neuzeit Wolff.

II Zeigler R. Smithsonian music. Musica Latina. Orgelbau Herbie Hancock. Jazz Parnass 1 Schmitz M. Music, cosmology and the politics of harmony in Early China Cook S. Rhythms of the Afroatlantic music Nordlind T. Svensk folkmusik och folkdans Samson J. Music in the Balkans Soroker Y. Ukrainian musical elements in classical music Zeranska-Kominek S. Muzyka w kulturze. The study of orchestration 2 Forsyth Cecil. Orchestration Leibowitz R, Maguire J. Il pensiero orchestrale Miller G.

Method for orchestral arranging Piston. Beethoven the pianist Vlahopol Gabriela.

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Rudolfinum pokladna kontakt torrent Although there are not many examples of notated musical works cited in the text for reasons of copyright, presumablythere are mentions of musical examples from a diverse variety of cultural backgrounds. One update that I think would be helpful would be to go beyond approaching interval identification by counting half steps so that students could learn to identify intervals without merely counting in this way. Stylistically, it is consistent, other issues notwithstanding. The larger problems are stylistic and typographical. Modularity is one of the best aspects of this publication.
Contemporary music theory pdf torrent However, I would find it difficult to use as a primary textbook for either music majors or non-majors. Again lengthy explanations are unnecessary. The text covers various concepts in music theory, some of which are fundamental, and others are advanced and complex, such as form. Examples of this can be found in chapter 3. Content Accuracy rating: 4 The content, in general, is accurate and unbiased. This perspective is missing from many classic books on music theory, and I would use this chapter by itself even in an advanced undergraduate continue reading course. Music must be at the center of any effective music theory discussion.
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Contemporary music theory pdf torrent Well-informed, this book attempts to cover a wide knowledge base for music theory, with more complex terms being introduced in less detail that would typically occur in an advanced text. Were I to teach out of this text, I could definitely see myself picking some material to use while supplementing or omitting some other sections. I was satisfied with the brief mention of raga theory, a subject about which I know more than a little. Many examples would not play. Lersahl, R. Clarity rating: 5 The prose is clear and accessible. Page 42 missed the chance to discuss "anacrusis".

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